Dry Valleys Workshop 2012 Questionnaire Responses

Questionnaire Responses

Question: What is your research discipline (i.e. evolutionary biology, ecosystem ecology, glaciology, meteorology, information management, etc.,)?

  • “Ecosystem ecology / soil biogeochemistry.” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Permafrost science, geomorphology, climatology.” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “Geochemistry, climate change science.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “Environmental management / policy advice.” –Neil Gilbert, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Geology.” –Bryan Storey, Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury
  • “Ecosystem ecology.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “Microbial ecology.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Microbial Ecology.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Microbial ecology, evolution.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “Microbial ecology.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “Ecosystem Ecology, Limnology.” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “Spatial ecology.” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Evolutionary physiology, ecology, phylogeography.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “Evolutionary microbiology, Microbial ecology, Fungi from extreme environments, resistance, adaptation.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Limnology.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “Information Management.” -Inigo San Gil, MCM LTER
  • “Aeolian Geomorphology.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Geospatial Modeling.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “Ecosystem ecology.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Ecosystem ecology.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Ecosystem ecology.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Permafrost Geology, Hydrology, Ecology” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Earth sciences.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “Environmental management informed by research.” -Ceisha Poirot, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Environmental management / GIS / data management.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “Microbial ecology.” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: What ecosystems do you study?  Please include key words such as lakes, glaciers, soils, etc.,.

  • “Soils.” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Soils, ground ice and rock.”-Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “Most of experience is in aquatic ones but I am becoming more interested in soil ones as well.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “No research discipline, though interested in the findings of all research that contributes to management outcomes.” –Neil Gilbert, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Landscape evolution/rates of glacial retreat.” –Bryan Storey, Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury
  • “Soils, streams.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “Soils.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Soils.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Soils.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “Lakes, soils, streams.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “Glaciers, Streams, Soils, Lakes (terrestrial and subglacial)” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “Terrestrial, soils, vegetation (above-ground, below-ground linkages)/” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Terrestrial soils and aboveground mostly.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “Rocks, Lithic microbial communities.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Lakes, ponds, cryoconites.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “All, lightly.” -Inigo San Gil, MCM LTER
  • “Those affected by wind: valleys, dunes, ice-covered lakes, ice-covered seas.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Soil distribution in the landscape, Soil microbial communities, Diversity of photosynthetic microbes within soils, streams and ponds, Soil Climate, Geospatial environmental classifications.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “Soils.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Vegetation (plants) and their relations with permafrost, soils, glaciers.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Streams.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Soils.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Permafrost terrain in the Antarctic and Arctic and Tibet, soils.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington.
  • “Environmental management informed by research.” -Ceisha Poirot, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “All.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “Subglacial lakes, lakes, soils, glaciers.” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: What do you measure? (for example, one of the things Byron would list is "Invertebrate community structure – number of each species, broken down by developmental stage, sex, living vs dead, etc. corrected for soil moisture (number of individuals per kg dry soil)"

  • “Soil chemistry - amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon (and sometimes other elements) in the soil (mass per g dry soil), pH, EC (uS/cm); Biotic activity - CO2 flux from the soil (umol CO2/m2/s)” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Ground and rock temperature, snow thickness, soil moisture, radiation, water discharge.” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “All inorganic chemicals and many stable, and radiogenic isotopes in streams, lakes and leachates from soils. We now have capabilities to do mineralogy and detailed SEM and EDAX work on soils, sediments, aeolian materials and suspended matter as well.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “Surface Exposure dating.” –Bryan Storey, Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury
  • “Sources and composition of soil organic matter, biogeochemical cycling, invertebrate and microbial community structure.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “Molecular microbial ecology of soils, including bacteria, archaea, cyanobacteria, and fungi.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Microbial diversity at all taxonomic levels (Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Fungi, Archaea) - assess structure and composition in relation to physicochemical variables (pH, conductivity, ATP, nutrients, elements, moisture etc.)” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Focus on fungi but also measure bacteria. Species diversity in each habitat, species ability to utilize carbon soruces, CO2 utilization (by species) We do ARISA, genomics, SIPs, culture studies.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “Bacterial diversity archaeal diversity microbial community composition community function (genes detected or expressed) respiration extracellular enzyme activity microbial biomass.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “Biogeochemical processes, microbial physiology, how much wild turkey one can consume per day.” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “Invertebrate community structure, in particular springtails, metrics include density/m2, richness. Plant community structure, species presence and abundance, particularly in relation to invasive species broader spatial patterns of all biodiversity in Antarctica (micro-organisms to vegetation), largely desktop exercise using current available data, statistical analyses and modeling to establish patterns and abiotic proxies.” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Species richness, density (m2), functional traits (e.g. metabolic rate), in springtails and insects and other inverts, for insects all stages except eggs usually.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “To date we focused mainly on phylogenetic relations, new taxa and their distribution and adaptation. In recent time we are focusing also on the biodiversity of epi- / endolithic colonizations, their distribution and variation in relation to the environmental conditions and possible Climate Change.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Water chemistry, biodiversity of cyano- and other bacteria, benthic mat community structure and activity, optical properties of ice and water.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “Meteorological conditions, horizontal flux of sand, vertical flux of dust-sized particles, deposition of dust-sized particles.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Soils - Several soil morphological features, which have proved useful for distinguishing among drift sheets in the MDVs (Bockheim and McLeod, 2006), are measured in the field including the depth of staining, the depth of coherence, accumulation of weathering products such as salts and iron oxide, the depth of “ghosts” (pseudomorphs), the depth of visible salts, salt and weathering stage, the depth to buried or ground ice or ice-cemented layer when less than 70 cm, and soil classification. Soil microbes- We determine the soil microbial community structure focusing on bacteria (heterotrophic) and phototrophs (bacteria and algae)-using a combination of culturing and molecular tools. DNA extracted from soil is used for DNA fingerprinting to compare microbial populations (DNA extraction methods and ARISA primers as per the Cary lab) and chose samples for next generation sequencing which provides information on bacterial composition – both living and dead (phyla and maybe family and genus). Culturing provides viable microbes for subsequent investigations (physiological and taxonomic). Diversity of photosynthetic microbes (in the past, have measured respiration and photosynthesis of communities in situ and in laboratory) Soil chemical properties typically measured on samples returned to NZ include – water content, pH, EC, Organic Carbon, Total Nitrogen, ammonium and nitrate-N, anions and cations, Total Kjeldahl P. Most are expressed per gram dry weight. Soil climate – Typically we measure soil and air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and wind speed. Soil temperature and water are recorded from the surface and sometimes down to 1.2m. We have also instrumented two boreholes for monitoring permafrost temperature.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “Soil invertebrates (number of each species, of each developmental stage, sex, living vs dead) and soil chemical and physical factors (SOC, TN, P, etc), texture, soil moisture and temp at different depths, annual mean temperature, soil choropyll a (as a proxy for primary production). GPS, Air temp.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Single moss and lichen species and vegetation community characteristics (floristic composition, species % coverage; collection of samples for species determination and potentially further analyses); analysis of vegetation patterns in relation with topographic, geographic and environmental gradients; assessment of soil characteristics (physical and chemical) in relation to vegetation; monitoring of a network of permanent plots along a latitudinal gradient (73°-77° including 19 plots installed since 2002); CO2 fluxes under different vegetation-soil (carrie out only in Antarctic peninsula until now).” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Diatom and bacterial community structure, hydrologic gradients, microbial diversity.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Soil temperature, soil moisture content, groundwater discharge, groundwater major ions and O/H isotopes, soil salinity, soil total carbon.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Soil microclimate to understand ice stability, soil movements in response to thermal cycling, and carbon cycling/storage, as well as periglacial activity. Measure surface and coreholes in permafrost chemical and isotopic parameters.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “A variety of observations relating to environmental management, including evidence of impacts, site boundaries, facilities etc.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “Microbial community structure and function - number of microorganism (number of cells per ml of water or gram of soil), molecular diversity (16S rRNA gene diversity, functional gene diversity), metabolic processes (rates of substrate incorporation, etc).” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: How do you take your measurements? (for example, one of the things Byron would list is, "100cc soil sample from homogenized 0-10cm soil core"

  • “500 g soil sample from homogenized 0-10 cm soil core; CO2 flux measurements from an infrered gas analyzer (LICOR)” -Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Depends from the project. For example I measured continuous soil temperature at 2, 30, 60 cm and deeper in permafrost down to 30 m. Snow cover is measured with sonic log on a point and with camera on a grid. Active layer depth is measured with periodic soil temperature at 2, 10, 20 and 30 cm and with a Frost Probe. On the rock temperature is measured at different depths (i.e. 0.5, 2, 10 cm and on surface with infrared sensors, light penetration is measured also).” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “Truly depends on the media, but if water usually 100 mL or less.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “Weathered rock surfaces up to a depth of 2 cms.” –Bryan Storey, Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury
  • “500cc soil sample from homogenized 0-10cm soil core.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “50 cc soil sample from homogenized 2-5 cm soil.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “70 gms of soil collected aseptically from upper 2-4 cms of soil profile.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Various- 1kg samples are split into aliquots for soil chemistry, culture analysis, RNA extraction, DNA extraction, archiving, lab experiments to monitor change in community under different experimental perturbations.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “5 to 50 cc of soil from homogenized 0-10 cm soil core 1-10 liters of lake or stream water, filtered onto stervex filter.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “Whatever works: automated/autonomous, chain saw, shovel, bucket, etc/” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “Invertebrates extracted from 70 mm soil cores using high gradient extractor and tullgren funnels. Plants measured in on-ground surveys. We also utilize remote sensing data and for both plant and more general landscape surveys.” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Soil cores (70 mm diam.) or sweep-netting, or tulgren sampling of fixed litter amounts, or defertinal wetting extraction, or high gradient extraction.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “Metagenomic DNA extraction from rock fragments, DGGE analysis to screen rock samples and pyrosequencing on a selection of samples. Isolation of microbes (mainly black fungi) in pure culture.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Background data collected from 150 ml water samples (filtered and unfiltered) on site pH, conductivity, DO instruments. Optics measured with submersible PAR sensors, including radial variability using divers. More specific measurements are made with microelectrodes (pH, DO), micro PAR sensors and microoptodes, fluorescence imaging and probing, homogenised core samples of mats for biomass, sectioned mat samples for pigment analyses (HPLC) microscopy and cyanobacterial molecular identifications, frozen water samples for 16s bacterial analysis, preserved water and mat samples for identification under standard and epifuorescence microscopy.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “Standard meteorological instruments, custom-designed sediment transport instruments both integrated and real-time.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Soils – Soil pits were sampled from the surface to the ice cemented layer or to 70cm whichever was deeper. Soil descriptions are based on Schoeneberger et al., 2002. Soil is classified using USDA soil taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff, 1999). Soil microbial – The sampling strategy was determined using our Wright Valley soil map. The experimental design involved digging four soil pits (up to 3 m3) in each soil type and sampling the desert pavement, and the soil horizon underlying the desert pavement. Soil samples are sieved on site and the < 4 mm fraction.”-Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “100cc soil sample from a scoop of soil, mix it in a bag, remove big rocks and then take to lab to extract. I buttons, Licor.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Field measurements with only limited sampling of moss and lichen species (partly sotred as exsiccata and partly stored at -20°C) field sampling of soil and standard laboratory analyses.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Algal mat cores.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Shallow coring and/or sampling with sterile scoops. Syringe extraction of groundwater. Chipping/coring of buried ice.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Sample soils from hand-dugs or backhoe excavated pits, dry-hole coring to depths of 30m, along with data-logging at 30 or 60 minute averaged intervals for up to 14 years at sites in the Arctic and Antarctic.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “Site description / photographs, aerial or satellite imagery and positions by GPS.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “Bulk liquid samples (collected in various vessels depending on processes to be measured), filtered water samples (i.e. 2L water concentrated on filters), bulk soil samples.” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: What is/are the location(s) of your measurements? (general, i.e. Taylor Valley, Wright Valley, etc.,)

  • “Taylor Valley (mostly Fryxell and Bonney basins); occasionally Marshall and Garwood Valleys, penguin rookeries (Cp Crozier, Royds, Bird).” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Northern Foothills, Antarctic Peninsula but also Victoria and Wrigth Valley, Marble Point.” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “At all MCM LTER sites/locations/monitoring loci, but have done some work in TAM locations in collaboration with other US and NZ scientists. Have also worked with Spanish on Livingston Island, South Shetlands.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “General.” –Bryan Storey, Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury
  • “Primarily Taylor and Wright Valleys, but also other locations in Southern and Northern Victoria Land and in the Central Transantarctic Mountains.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “Alatna Valley, Battleship Promontory, Victoria Valley, McKelvey Valley, Wright Valley, Taylor Valley, Beacon Valley, University Valley, Garwood Valley, Marshall Valley, Miers Valley, and Hidden Valley.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Over entire DV system - NZTABS will visit almost all of the major valleys by next year including, Miers, Garwood, Marshall, Taylor, Wright, McKelvey, Victoria, Alatna, Beacon).” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Taylor Valley, Wright Valley, Mt. Erebus, Mt. Discovery area (dirty ice and flanks of mountain).” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “Taylor Valley Wright Valley.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “MCM dry valleys, subglacial lakes of the Siple Coast, subglacial systems beneath the Ross Ice Shelf.” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “Macquarie Island, Marion Island, whole of ice-free Antarctic for biodiversity analyses.” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Marion island, prince Edward Island, macquarie Island, Gough Island, Heard island, South Georgia, Dronning Maud Land (Northern Ahlmannryggen).” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “To date Battleship Promontory, University Valley, Linnaeus Terrace, Convoy Range and many locations in the Northern Victoria Land. We are now interested in extending the sampling area as much as possible.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Taylor Valley, Wright Valley, McMurdo Ice Shelf, Koetlittz region.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “Taylor, Wright, Victoria, with an interest in other locations with known aeolian sediment transport features (e.g., Asgard Range, Bennett Platform).” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Soil surveys and maps – Completed the Wright Valley, and selected windows at Cape Hallett and near Lake Wellman in the Darwin Mountains. Soil surveys and maps are being developed for other areas in the Ross Sea region including Victoria Valley, Barwick Valley, Ballham Valley and McKelvey Valley. Soil microbial diversity assessment – currently focused in the Wright Valley. Photosynthetic microbes – currently focused in the Wright Valley. Soil climate stations are installed – in Wright Valley (Don Juan Pond, Bull Pass, Bull Pass East), Marble Point, Scott Base, Minna Bluff, Granite Harbour, Victoria Valley and Mt Fleming. Permafrost temperature monitoring is undertaken in boreholes at Marble Point and Bull Pass within walking distance to the soil climate stations. Map and coordinates - http://soils.usda.gov/survey/smst/antarctica/index.html.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “Taylor Valley to Cape Hallet and south to Myers Desert.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Close to Dry Valley I have installed three permanent plots at Finger Point and I've sampled vegetation at Marble Point, Fryxell Lake area, Cape Bernacchi, Commonwealth Glacier.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Taylor Valley, Wright Valley, Miers Valley.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Garwood Valley, Taylor Valley, Wright Valley.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Beacon Valley, Victoria Valley, Taylor Valley, Mt Fleming (limited), Mauna Kea, Thule (Pittufikk), Greenland.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “All Dry Valleys.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “Primarily Taylor Valley.” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: Location of data  (i.e. data repository, such as "http://www.usap-data.org/" and/or "my laptop")

  • “My laptop; data server at Dartmouth; MCM-LTER website.” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “My laptop and M. Balks laptop for data coming from Marble Point and Wright Valley.” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretical and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “Most in MCM LTER data repository.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization.” –Bryan Storey, Gateway Antarctica, University of Canterbury
  • “MCMLTER.org.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “nzTABS and my laptop.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “www.usap-data.org, GenBank, local database.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Cultures are submitted to international culture collections. data is on our computers- We find that there is a great need for a repository for data storage so other researchers can access.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “http://www.mcmlter.org/ http://metagenomics.anl.gov/ https://img.jgi.doe.gov/cgi-bin/mer/main.cgi my private server at hans.unm.edu.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “mcm.org.” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “http://data.aad.gov.au/.” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Centre for Invasion Biology Information Retrieval and Submission System.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “My laptop.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “NIWA, Christchurch or my laptop/external hard drive.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “http://mcmlter.org.” -Inigo San Gil, MCM LTER
  • “Metadata for available data is identified in the NASA-administered Global Change Master Directory at the following url: http://gcmd.nasa.gov/KeywordSearch/Metadata.do?Portal=GCMD&MetadataType=0&MetadataView=Full&KeywordPath=&EntryId=NSF_OPP_0636218 Raw data maintained on my office PC The identifier is: NSF_OPP_0636218.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Soil Climate data is publically available on the USDA Soil Climate website (http://soils.usda.gov/survey/smst/antarctica/index.html) All other work is on our network at Landcare Research, Genbank, and in published papers.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “MCMLTER website.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “My laptop.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Mcmlter.org, some data on laptop, publications.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “mcmlter.org, my laptop.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Multiple. Most chemical data appears as supplementary material in my students papers in refereed journals. Also metadata is located at NASA Global Change Master Directory (http://gcmd.gsfc.nasa.gov/) and real data will be added there.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “Primary data held and managed by ERA on storage array. Relevant data shared with USAP / Antarctica NZ and PGC.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “NCBI, MCM-LTER and my laptop.” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: Describe your long-term datasets. Include frequency of repeat measures and duration of the experiment.

  • “Annual measurements made on the core experiments of the MCM-LTER (for my part, that's mostly the stoichiometry experiment, with soil chemistry measured every other year, and soil CO2 flux at least once per field season, since 2007-08); (2) Soil CO2 flux measurements over 24-hour periods of time from various locations (mostly Fryxell basin, Hoare basin, and Ross Island) from 2008-2011.” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Continuous monitoring at Marble Point and Wrigth Valley (in cooperation with M. Balks, Waikato Univ and Landcare Research) are going since 2008. Victoria Valley borehole was measured on 2006 and should be remeasured next year and, in case of enough funding could be continuous.” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “20 years of lake, stream geochemical monitoring measurements for MCM-LTER locations (more than 1 time per yr, every yr). Any types of measurements (trace elements and isotopes) made less frequently.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “Soil temperature (hourly) and water content (daily). Duration varies by site. Longest running monitoring has been ongoing since 1993.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “Annual sampling in Miers Valley. Spot sampling elsewhere.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “We have 1-2 year MET station data from each valley, 50-100 button placements ridge to ridge in each valley, Time-lapse camera records for entire year in selected valleys.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Longest term dataset is from 2002 and repeat measurements of community in the same area.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “MCM LTER.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “Phytoplankton productivity and biomass, bacterial productivity and biomass, lake chemistry.” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “Processed data from Scar Antarctic Biodiversity Database, whole of ice-free Antarctica 38 000 + records, ~1800 taxa. Represents data from last 20+ years, could potentially extract some time-series data from this, but nothing structured. Also have long-term monitoring studies in the sub-Antarctic for both plants (30+ years, sporadic surveys) and invertebrates (10 years, 5 yearly surveys).” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Ten years worth of temperature data across 1000 m elevational transect at Marion island. Body size of weevils studied at regular intervals for past 30 years. Invertebrate densities sampled every 8-10 years since 1977 for the Prince Edward Islands.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “We have available a wide selection of rock samples collected in the past years from which isolations have been performed already. All the information about fungi isolated are stored in a private database (access). It will be available on-line soon. Studies on biodiversity are still in progress. Future sampling campaigns depend on the approval of research project by the PNRA.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Bratina Island long term dataset, not complete but for a 20 year period we have measured water chemistry, planktonic and benthic community biomass and basic meteorological variables. Lake Hoare - at 2-3 year intervals we have characterized benthic microbial communities from 7 to 20 m depth, using pigments and morphology.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “A two-year record of 10 minute mean meteorological and saltation activity data was collected at four sites in three of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (Taylor, Victoria, and Wright), Antarctica, 2008-2010. Time integrated measurements of the horizontal saltation flux (kg m-1 day-1) were obtained in both years using sediment traps. Particle size analyses of wind blown sediment (sand-sized) from trap samples collected in the Taylor, Wright, and Victoria Valley. Based on two years of collection. Particle size analysis of the wind formed gravel bed form sediments in the Wright Valley. Time-integrated sediment trap samples of horizontal saltation and creep fluxes (two and one year, respectively). Measurements of the horizontal displacement of tracer particles (14mm, 12 mm, 10 mm, 8 mm, and 6 mm diameter) placed onto the bed forms surface (one and two year samples.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “Nine long-term soil climate stations established. Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Data is downloaded every year. Metadata on each station can be found here http://soils.usda.gov/survey/smst/antarctica/index.html). Intended to be a long run experiment and currently has some stations running in excess of 13 years. Marble Point – Installed January 1999 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 120 cm, soil water content (2, 20, 50, and 80 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Scott Base – Installed January 1999 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 120 cm, soil water content at (2, 15, 25, and 40 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, net radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Minna Bluff – Installed January 2003 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 107 cm, soil water content (2, 5, 15, 25, 38, 60, and 94 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Granite Harbour – Installed January 2003 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 90 cm, soil water content (2, 5, 15, 25, 45, and 75 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Victoria Valley – Installed January 1999 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 120 cm, soil water content (10, 33, 83, 91, and 106 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Mt Fleming – Installed January 2002 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 60 cm, soil water content (7.5, 15, and 30 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Don Juan Pond – Installed January 2011 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 120 cm, soil water content (2, 10, and 25 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, soil pore humidity (2 and 10 cm depths), solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Bull Pass – Installed January 1999 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 120 cm, soil water content (2, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 120 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Bull Pass East – Installed January 2012 This station monitors soil temperature to a depth of 120 cm, soil water content (2, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 120 cm depths), air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind (speed and direction). Measurements are made at 20-minute intervals and averaged and recorded every hour. Two boreholes about 30 m in depth were installed in 2006/07 at Marble Point and Bull Pass instrumented for monitoring permafrost temperature. Measurements are made once every hour and recording an average every six hours using a Campbell Scientific CR100 measurement and control system datalogger.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “YIPES! Annually! And sometimes every 2 -3 years. Varies. Some experiments are long term - others are 1-2 years.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Data from my permanent plots and 2002/2003 surveys, data from the 2012 surveys of the permanent plots (to be completed in the campaign 2012/12 due to snow cover occurrence)” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Stream algal mat transect data, collected every 1-3years, hydrologic data collected annually, since at least 1994.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Taylor Valley active layer and water track station. 40 cm profile of temperature and soil moisture, measured at 15 minute intervals since 2009.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Beacon Valley: 14 years microclimate, polygonal ground motion, borehole temperatures since 1998 for some sites with hourly data. Victoria Valley: same as above. Taylor Valley: same as above since 2007. Greenland: similar data at 2 sites since 2003.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “GIS data on geographical features in the Dry Valleys, including natural features such as lakes, streams, glacier margins, coastlines, etc., based on mapping data derived from multiple sources including USGS 1:50K series, the ADD and detailed digital orthophotos for specific locations, especially the protected areas.” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “I do not currently have any long-term experiments, but I make measurements of bacterial biomass whenever I visit Blood Falls.” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: If applicable, describe your sample repository (i.e. an ice core storage facility, curated specimen repository, museum or herbarium, frozen tissue library, etc.).

  • “Storage in laboratory (-20C freezer for frozen soils, shelf space for dried soils at room temperature), not curated officially but well-documented.” –Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “We have a permafrost frozen samples repository managed by the Italian National Anatrctic Program close to Milan and a personal freezer (-20°C) in our lab where samples are kept during and immediately before the analyses.” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “Do save a few years of previously collected samples.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “Soils stored in -20 freezers.” -Jeb Barrett, MCM LTER
  • “Frozen soil and extracted DNA samples.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “-80°C freezers contain all soil samples curated and archived.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Cultures are submitted to international culture collections. We also keep isolates stored in our laboratory. The conditions depend on the species, some -80C, some 4C.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “Curated private freezers.” -Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, MCM-LTER
  • “Australian Antarctic Division storage.” --Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Museums in South Africa. Frozen or ethanol stored specimens at Centre for Invasion Biology.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “The Mycological Section of the Italian Antarctic Museum “Felice Ippolito” of our Department. The section hosts the CCFEE (Culture Collection of fungi From Extreme Environments), - born from fungal strains given by E.I. Friedmann, the cryptoendolithic communities discoverer - where all the fungal cultures isolated from rocks collected in the Antarctic are deposited, and a collection of colonized rocks.” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “Freezer in Christchurch, which went off during recent earthquakes and resulted in all samples being lost! A lesson for all.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “All soil pit information collected for the Ross Sea region is stored in accordance with the New Zealand National Soil’s Database held by Landcare Research. Soil collected for microbial analyses is typically stored at -70oC. We deposit microbial gene sequences in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and microbial cultures in the LCR International Collection for Microorganisms for Plants (ICMP) once published. Photosynthetic microbes are held in the culture collection at Landcare Research, frozen samples in PC2 molecular laboratory.” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “I have 26 freezers of Antarctic soil; some nematodes are cultured on bacteria and agar media in an incubator.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Exsiccata are stored at my laboratory (Insubria University), we still do not have a University herbarium frozen samples are partly stored at Insubria labos (Prof. Guglielmin) and partly at Milan-Bicocca University.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Formalin-preserved and archived mat samples at INSTAAR, CU Boulder frozen DNA samples stored at INSTAAR.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “UW freezers, UW foreign samples. working on repositing samples at other locations.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “Glycerol stocks of microbial isolates at UTK (this could be done better).” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK

Question: Please list any one-time surveys or measurements that you know of that could serve as a baseline for repeated measures in the future.

  • “Soil chemistry and soil CO2 flux at the three large adelie penguin rookeries on Ross Island (Cp Bird, Royds, and Crozier) (2) Moss stoichiometry (C, N and P conent) from many locations (Taylor Valley (Fryxell and Hoare basins), Garwood and Marshall Valleys, penguin rookeries on Ross Island (3) Soil chemistry (and some CO2 flux) from meltwater seep patches in Fryxell basin.” -Becky Ball, MCM LTER
  • “Do new boreholes (down to 30 m deep at least) or subsurafce (1 m) boreholes could do one time and continously monitored or periodically thermal monitored every year or every 4-5 years (depends if deep or subsurface).” -Mauro Guglielmin, Dep. Theoretichal and Applied Science, Insubria University Varese Italy
  • “Potentially stable isotopes of water in streams and surface lake samples, but perhaps not every year.” -Berry Lyons, MCM LTER
  • “nzTABS.” –Charles Lee, ICTAR, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “NZTABS coverage for each valley - 100-600 samples collected with full physicochemical analysis coverage. Each could serve as base line. In particular, any of the samples located on or near to transects.” -Craig Cary, NSF and Antarctica New Zealand
  • “We have done cross valley transects (Taylor) from above 300m from valley floor across to the other side at three points in the valley (New harbor area, Lk Fryxell basin and Bonnie basin. These transects were used for fungal survey. We have also done initial survey of fungi associated with several ponds in the Labyrinths.” –Laurie Connell, University of Maine
  • “Phytoplankton productivity and biomass, bacterial productivity and biomass, standard physical/chemical data on lakes.” –JP, MCM LTER
  • “See long-term datasets.” -Aleks Terauds, Australian Antarctic Division
  • “Much work on Marion Island. Surveys of nunataks around Robertskollen, Dronning maud Land.” -Steven Chown, SA National Antarctic Programme at Stellenbosch University
  • “Surveys and sampling have been performed in the MCM Dry Valleys on 1996 (Battleship Promontory), on 2003 (Battlesship Promontory, Linnaeus Terrace, University Valley, Convoy Range) and on 2011 (Battleship Promontory).” -Laura Selbmann, Italian National Program for Antarctic Research
  • “We now have data from ponds in the Upper Wright labyrinth from 2004 and 2012. Between these times all snow-fed, closed-basin ponds showed substantial reductions in water level and increases in ionic content, while all ice-fed, open-basin ponds showed no change. Bratina Island ponds show changes that are weakly linked to climate fluctuations, but appear best described by winter snowfall. Endorheic ponds are very sensitive to hydrological balance, we know that the biota is sensitive to changes in chemistry and as long-term indicators of subtle changes in climate they would offer an excellent counterpoint to the existing lake monitoring. NZ could consider taking the lead in this, it is not logistics-intensive and they have a history of work in that area.” -Ian Hawes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • “Two-year trap and real-time measurements of saltation flux in the DVs should be extended to much longer time intervals to characterize and quantify changes over time.” -Jack Gillies, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reon, NV
  • “LIDAR used (US Flown) flown for the region ALOS Prism Satellite imagery for the Wright Valley Calculations of net carbon fixation in communities of Nostoc on soil in the Garwood Valley (published in Global Change Biology 2007).” -Fraser Morgan, Landcare Research New Zealand
  • “Soil Moisture, population demographics of invertebrates, frequency of occurrence in a defined area.” -Diana Wall, MCM LTER
  • “Sampling moss and lichens (including epilithic and endolithic samples) at whatever location and along the latitudinal gradient to improve the basic knowledge of the moss and lichen flora of the Dry Valleys and to fill the knowledge gaps on the Ross sector moss and lichen flora.” -Nicoletta Cannone, Insubria University
  • “Temperature/soil moisture measurements in stream margins molecular survey of algal mat bacterial diversity and community composition across streams and mat types.” -Lee Stanish, MCM LTER
  • “Water track depth/temperature/soil moisture surveys 2009, 2010. Upcoming all-valley water track discharge survey 2012.” –Joe Levy, Oregon State University
  • “Carbon stored in permafrost on Greenland. Salts in Taylor Valley. Rock tablets installed by Malin in the MDV. Contraction crack opening of Robert Black and our measurements. Soils throughout Dry Valleys.” –Ronald Sletten, University of Washington
  • “I entered all of New Zealand's metadata into the Antarctic Master Directory from 1959 to 2009. There are numerous survey's that have been conducted that could be useful.” -Ceisha Poirot, Antarctica New Zealand
  • “Type and locations of facilities in the Dry Valleys. This could serve as an important historical archive of site activity. This could be extended to include sampling locations (more difficult to coordinate input of data to a common database across disciplines and countries).” –Colin Harris, Environmental Research & Assessment
  • “Iron concentrations (streams and lakes), methane concentrations (lakes).” -Jill Mikucki, MCM LTER, UTK